Water and Sanitation Project

Water and Sanitation Project

In Zimbabwe, over 60% of the water supply systems do not function properly. As a result, many boreholes and wells contain non potable water. In addition, a lack of clean bathrooms and sanitary facilities at schools pose a serious health threat to students. Consequently, Zimbabwe is experiencing outbreaks of water-borne diseases such as bilharzia, malaria and cholera. The Salvation Army started a project to improve health conditions of 12 communities in Zimbabwe by improving access to water, sanitation and food support.

Water and Sanitation
Nearly 20% of the world’ population does not have adequate access to clean water. In addition, one out of three people lacks basic sanitation. In Zimbabwe, getting clean drinking water is a serious challenge. More than half of the water supply systems do not function properly and as a result, many boreholes and wells contain non potable water. Due to unavailability of proper sanitary facilities, some schools are on the verge of closing as they pose a health threat to their students. All around Zimbabwe people are experiencing outbreaks of water-borne diseases which are among the leading causes of death.

Project
The Salvation Army started a project to improve health and nutrition in 12 communities in Zimbabwe. Toilets and sinks with clean drinking water sources have been installed. In addition, school hygiene committees have been set up for teachers where they receive training about hygiene, healthcare and clean food so they, in turn, can teach their students. In all 12 communities, The Salvation Army set up farm gardens and irrigation systems for the communities to grow their own produce. This way, people are enabled to control their food sources, which will reduce the occurrence of diseases as a result of contaminated food.

 

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